Basic Camp

Cadets negotiate Preliminary Marksmanship Instruction

FORT KNOX, KY. – Cadet Initial Entry Training (CIET) Alpha Company 5th Regiment Cadets train at the Preliminary Marksmanship Instruction (PMI) pit to learn the foundation for firing weapons before applying their lessons at the firing range.

Keven Carson, St. Bonaventure University, stands in correct postion for shooting during Preliminary Marksmanship Instruction (PMI) on June 5, 2016 at Fort Knox. PMI teaches Cadets how to maintain and fire their rifle. Photo By Kasey Ricketts.

Keven Carson, St. Bonaventure University, stands in correct postion for shooting during Preliminary Marksmanship Instruction (PMI) on June 5, 2016 at Fort Knox. PMI teaches Cadets how to maintain and fire their rifle. Photo By Kasey Ricketts.

PMI is where Cadets will learn the foundations of how to fire their weapons properly, and the training takes course over several days.

Sgt. Kristopher Carbine, Ft. Carson, Colo., is the Marksmanship Master Trainer and Subject Matter Expert onsite at the PMI pit and helps assist the Cadets in their training.

“At PMI they are going to have two classes on fundamentals. The fundamentals consist of steady body position, side alignment, point of aim, breathing, trigger manipulation, and follow-through,” Carbine said, “It’s very important that we go over these fundamentals because of the fact that it improves the base core foundation for shooting.”

Cdt. George Allen, Military Science third-year (MS III), Columbus State University, native of Smiths Station, Ala., expressed the importance of remaining focused during PMI training.

“Today we brought the Cadets to learn marksmanship. This is great practice to help them to succeed in future missions. As long as they stay focused on the five fundamentals of shooting, they’ll be successful,” Allen said.

Cadets will also be engaged in ballistics and minute of angle classes. The classes demonstrate the science behind the flight of the bullet when fired, and also how to properly adjust their sights before shooting.

“The foundation of marksmanship is the most important aspect and value of this training. When Cadets are not only able to retain the fundamentals but refine them as well, they’ll be able to create muscle memory. They will have more accurate shots and become a proficient marksman,” Carbine said, “We want to refine their shooting skills without inducing any extra stress on their bodies.”

Kayla Grove, Norfolk State University, learns to assemble her rifle during Preliminary Marksmanship Instruction (PMI) on June 5, 2016 at Fort Knox. Photo By Kasey Ricketts.

Kayla Grove, Norfolk State University, learns to assemble her rifle during Preliminary Marksmanship Instruction (PMI) on June 5, 2016 at Fort Knox. Photo By Kasey Ricketts.

Carbine believes that Cadets confidence is key when firing a weapon.

“In case you are ever engaged, you have to be able to defend yourself. You need the confidence within your weapon system, yourself, and the person to the left and right to not only defend, but to win,” Carbine said.

PMI is the first step in firing training for the CIET Cadets at Fort Knox.

“After this training the Cadets go to a simulator range. They will simulate shooting on computers to get percentage scores before moving on to Group Zero, which is the firing range,” Allen said.

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Emily LaForme

A student at Michigan State University, Emily is a Public Affairs Intern for U.S. Army Cadet Command of Fort Knox, KY. Emily has a passion for all things military, journalism, and MSU football.

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