Basic Camp (CIET)

Cadets learn the importance of land navigation

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5th Regiment CIET Alpha Company Cadets undergo Land Navigation training July 11, 2016, at Fort Knox, KY. Rebekah Frandy (left), 19, from the University of Virginia, and Catherine Lynch (right), 18, from Mount St. Mary’s University, both found their land navigation training beneficial to their military experience. “We have four points to find by a certain time. Yesterday we had a class going over land navigation and now we’re doing it in real-life.” Cdt. Frandy says. Photo by Lora Sparks

FORT KNOX, Ky. – 5th Regiment Cadet Initial Entry Training (CIET) Alpha Company Cadets went through Land Navigation training to hone navigation skills July 11.

Cadets use their basic knowledge of map-reading with their battle buddy, map, compass, and protractor to reach all four points, completing the Land Navigation course.

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5th Regiment CIET Alpha Company Cadets undergo Land Navigation training July 11, 2016, at Fort Knox, KY. Here Cadets head out to the forest trails to test out their navigation skills. Photo by Lora Sparks

Cdt. Rebekah Frandy, University of Virginia, found her land navigation training beneficial to her military knowledge.

“We have four points to find by a certain time. Yesterday we had a class going over land navigation and now we’re doing it in real-life.” Frandy said.

“The main purposes of this training is confidence and knowledge, if and when electronics fail,” Dillon said.

Land Navigation is a ground-based unit for the U.S. Army used to find their way through terrain and reach target destinations.

Mr. Frank Barrow, Tactical Operations Center (TOC) Officer in Charge (OIC), explains how Cadets learn to read a map, plan and navigate from point A to point B.

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5th Regiment CIET Alpha Company Cadets undergo Land Navigation training July 11, 2016, at Fort Knox, KY. Kathleen Shaw (left), 19, from Slippery Rock University of Pennsylvania and Rachel Hobgood (right), 20, from the University of North Georgia navigate through the thick forrest terrain. Photo by Lora Sparks

“They learn evaluative skills that are applicable to real-life military careers. It’s probably one of the most important things the Cadets will learn, other than being able to shoot. We wouldn’t be able to function as the Army without it.” Barrow states.

If Cadets weren’t proficient in land navigation training they could get lost, hit rough terrain, travel into enemy territory, lose the element of surprise and potentially put their platoon at risk.

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Lora Sparks

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