Basic Camp (CIET)

4th Regiment CIET takes on Hand Grenade Assault Course

4th Regiment of Cadet Initial Entry Training (CIET) tackled the hand grenade assault course where they learned how to knock out a bunker, grenade identification, and proper battle form when handling live ammunition.

Step 1. Identify the enemy.

Step 2. Prep grenade. Identify the pin, make sure it’s secure.

Step 3. Extend your dominant leg back into the dirt.

Step 4. Bring your body up. Your non-dominant leg should be bent at a 90 degree angle, facing towards your enemy.

Step 5. Point your non-dominant hand at a 45 degree angle toward your target.

Step 6. Extend dominant hand back, as if you are about to throw a baseball.

Step 7. Throw.

Step 8. Chest to dirt. Yell, “Frag out!”

Step 9. Back to initial position.

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Cadets of 4th Regiment Cadet initial Entry Training (CIET), Bravo Company, listen to important procedures to safely throw grenades in kneeling position as part of their Hand Grenade Assault Course at Fort Knox Ky., July 7. Photo by: Linh Nguyen

Today’s training was broken up into four exercises. The first being Individual Movement Techniques (IMT), where the proper form is covered including low and high crawls, standing position, kneeling position and prone-to-kneeling position is covered. Second being Grenade Identification, where grenade care, different parts of the grenade and how to throw it are instilled in Cadets. Third, Knock-out-a-bunker, where squad tactics with simulated live ammunition is introduced. Lastly, all skills covered in the first three exercises are put to test in the final stage, the Hand Grenade Assault Course.

Staff Sergeant Charlie Rubin explains the importance of the final stage. “This is designed to be the culmination event of everything learned over there [exercise one through four]. This is a big version of the tactics operations. This is where they put what they’ve learned into practice.

Practice was key, each Cadet was grilled on every step of how to correctly throw a grenade. For soldier, being adequately prepared can be the difference between life and death in a combat situation. Something Cadet Shantel Coburn, from Saint Augustine University, understood well.

“I’ve never thrown a grenade before and I was actually scared, because if you throw it the wrong way it can actually explode, when you take your time you realize its actually not that hard. I feel like now if I actually go to combat, I’ll be prepared.”

The majority of CIET Cadets have not been exposed to military training prior to Cadet Summer Training (CST). Staff Sergeant Michael Lawson explains why that has been the biggest obstacle thus far.

Staff Sergeant Lawson helps Cdt. Preston Hughes, Georgia Southern University, and Cdt. Perenon Shiloh, California State University-Sacramento, 4th Regiment Cadet Initial Entry Training (CIET) learn proper way to throw grenades in kneeling position for Hand Grenade Assault Course at Fort Knox Ky., July 7. Photo by: Linh Nguyen.

Staff Sergeant Lawson helps Cdt. Preston Hughes, Georgia Southern University, and Cdt. Perenon Shiloh, California State University-Sacramento, 4th Regiment Cadet Initial Entry Training (CIET) learn proper way to throw grenades in kneeling position for Hand Grenade Assault Course at Fort Knox Ky., July 7.
Photo by: Linh Nguyen.

“These Cadets have not been in an environment like this with heat and wearing the uniforms, they’re not really sure what they are wearing and how to use it. We do our crawl, walk run method, starting off slowly and getting them up. From the time they start to the time they finish during this 30-day period, it’s two different people. They come in as a civilian and leave some what a military person.”

If these Cadets move on to become officers of the U.S. Army, the likely hood of them having to throw a grenade in a real life situation is slim. However, it is crucial that these future leaders know the proper procedure just as a standard, also they will need to know what their future non commissioned officers (NCOs) will go through one day to be an effective leader.

Leadership is definitely a key force every Cadet is pushed to learn, Cadet Dentarious Montgomery, from Jackson State University, says that his exercise today has taught him a bit more. “Today was hard and fun at the same time, I was still able to get through it and make the best of it. Resilience and never give up, that’s what I learned today.”

With that attitude he and his team will be able to tackle the rest CST head on, as they did today.

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Savannah Walker

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