Basic Camp (CIET)

CIET Cadets increase confidence through land navigation

CIET 1ST Regiment Alpha Company Cadets hone land navigation skills to further develop confidence in the field.

Cadets are broken into teams of two or three and given specific points that they must plot on maps and then navigate in the field.

The cadets start at a lightning protection structure where they receive a briefing and are given four points to plot and track. They must then locate a minimum of three points within a 3-hour time span in order to complete the challenge.

Cdt. Egor Krasnonosenkikh, Cadet Intial Entry Training (CIET) First Regiment Alpha Co. from the University of Wisconsin - Oshkosh, looks at his protactor to prepare for the land navigation course. Ft Knox, KY June 14. .Photo by 1Sgt. Anthony J. Florence

Cdt. Egor Krasnonosenkikh, Cadet Intial Entry Training (CIET) First Regiment Alpha Co. from the University of Wisconsin – Oshkosh, looks at his protactor to prepare for the land navigation course. Ft Knox, KY June 14. .Photo by 1Sgt. Anthony J. Florence

1Lt. Nicholas Nagel looks at the land navigation exercise as a molding opportunity for cadets.

“This enhances their situational awareness to their surroundings, and helps them develop their mission analysis, confidence and resiliency,” Nagel said.

Cdt. Mason Miller, native of Montgomery Alabama, Concordia College, understands the importance of teamwork and compromise during the navigation exercise.

“Teamwork is going to be the most important today, you know your battle buddy, you know their strengths and weaknesses, and when you get to their weakness then that’s your turn to step into your leadership role,” Miller said.

Cdt. Isaac Arriola, native of Chesapeake, Virginia, Hampton University, was excited to be gaining new knowledge to take with him as a future leader.

“Overall this is a great learning experience for me, because I didn’t come here with much prior knowledge. For me to be able to come here and learn about land navigation, the proper way of doing it, the effective way of doing it, it’s really helping me to be a better future leader,” Arriola said.

In addition to participating in land navigation during the day, Cadets will also be practicing at nighttime.

“This is another part of building resiliency and confidence. We are getting them used to operating at night because the U.S. Army owns the night on combat operations. We want our future leaders used to moving at night,” Nagel said.

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Emily LaForme

A student at Michigan State University, Emily is a Public Affairs Intern for U.S. Army Cadet Command of Fort Knox, KY. Emily has a passion for all things military, journalism, and MSU football.

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