Basic Camp

Cadets engage in first-aid training with instructors’ first-hand experiences

FORT KNOX, Ky. – Cadet Initial Entry Training (CIET), 1st Regiment, Alpha Company Cadets learned essential first-aid skills with hands-on training at Bldg. 6003 June 12. 

According to demonstrator SSgt. Jeffrey Hargan of Ft. Lewis, Wash., it is imperative to know, as an Army officer, what Soldiers do to better lead them.

“Leaders should know what their Soldiers are also going to be learning.  Having an understanding of basic first-aid is very important.  So, anybody can step in, no matter what their rank is,” said Hargan. 

Cadets Jennifer Francescon and Kathleen Barnes, Cadet Initial Entry Training, 1st Regiment, Alpha Company practice CPR at the first-aid class, Fort Knox, June 12. Photo by Ariana Aubuchon

Cadets Jennifer Francescon and Kathleen Barnes, CIET, 1st Regiment, Alpha Company practice CPR at the first-aid class, Fort Knox, Ky., June 12. Photo by Ariana Aubuchon

Michael Sebastionelli, the CIET first-aid Non-Commissioned Officer in Charge stationed at Ft. Lewis, Wash. and native of Sierra Vista, Ariz., said he wants Cadets to know the difference between combat medicine and the medicine they see outside the military.

“Not only would they have to deal with treating the casualty, but they would have to deal with the tactical situation of a combat environment while still maintaining mission effectiveness,” Sebastionelli stated.

Cadets Collin Nash and Zacarias Imperial, Cadet Initial Entry Training, 1st Regiment, Alpha Company, practice tying bandages on leg wounds, Fort Knox, June 12. Photo by Ariana Aubuchon

Cadets Collin Nash and Zacarias Imperial, CIET, 1st Regiment, Alpha Company practice tying bandages on leg wounds, Fort Knox, Ky., June 12. Photo by Ariana Aubuchon

Cadets rotated through four separate stations to learn how to combat the “three biggest killers on the battlefield”.  According to Sebastionelli, they are obstructed airways due to facial injuries, open-chest wounds and bleeding from extremities,  which account for 60 percent of combat deaths.

The most valuable tools at training were the firsthand experiences the instructors and demonstrators shared with Cadets, according to Cdt. Adam Floyd, a rising junior of Norwich University and native of Merrimack, N.H.

“The instructors were really bringing the training to life,” Floyd noted.

One instructor, SSgt. Michael Hernandez of Ft. Lewis, Wash., shared his personal experiences with Cadets to inspire and motivate them.

By sharing his personal experiences, he hopes Cadets will walk away from first-aid training with practical knowledge.

“It’s going to prepare them to be not only better leaders, but better citizens,” Hernandez said.

By the end of the morning, Cdt. Floyd said he felt more confident in his knowledge of first-aid.

Floyd added, “It’s motivating to me because I could be that next guy to save somebody, and I don’t have to be a medic to do that.”

Each session ended with an After-Action Review which allowed Cadets to provide constructive feedback to instructors and demonstrators.

                                 

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Sade' Wilson

Sade' Wilson is an alumna of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill where she studied media and journalism and minored in religious studies. She has two dogs and is working to become a professional Tori Kelly fan.

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