Basic Camp

Cadets continue three day field training

By: Katie McGuire

Cadets of the CIET second regiment continued their field training this week by practicing four important missions: Recon, attack, ambush, and react to contact. All are important in cadet leadership training.

The cadets have been out in the field since Sunday doing a number of training exercises in a mythical country called Atropia, which they were deployed to.

The cadets started off with a Recon mission, or they observed the enemy and their movements. This included a squad finding the enemy and determining the number of weapons they have, how big of a group they are, and if they pose a threat.

They then practiced an ambush mission by staging a zone based on the anticipated location of enemy. Here, the cadets got to use Claymore mines, which are command-detonated shrapnel.

Cadets work to provide 360 degree security around the squad leader and the "injured" cadets during a training exercise. CIET cadets go through Leadership Field Training Exercises. The cadets spend several days in a patrol base and go on missions as a squad to practice reconnaissance, ambush, and other tactics. U.S. Army photo by Matt Lunsford. June 29, 2015.

Cadets work to provide 360 degree security around the squad leader and the “injured” cadets during a training exercise. CIET cadets go through Leadership Field Training Exercises. The cadets spend several days in a patrol base and go on missions as a squad to practice reconnaissance, ambush, and other tactics. U.S. Army photo by Matt Lunsford. June 29, 2015.

Cadets later learned the difference between an ambush, a staged tactic, and an attack. The Assault team attacks and the support team is there to recover any unplanned enemies showing up or unknown weapons being used.

Finally the cadets practiced a React to Contact mission. In this exercise the cadets learn what it feels like to be spotted by the enemy as well as being attacked by the enemy.

This training includes four days of switching rolls so that all cadets can understand what it feels like to be on opposing sides and what it’s like to be in  a leadership position in the field. They also learn the technical side of crossing a road and how to do it as well as marksmanship and fire control in a tactical situation.

2nd Lt. Larry Lightburne believes this is important to Cadet Summer Training because it incorporates the overall goal: Leadership. “They’re learning about leadership and communication skills. These lanes are a tool to teach them to lead under harsh conditions like the rain, and conduct a mission,” he said.

2nd Lt. Reggie Almario agrees. “It teaches communication in a team environment, teaches the practicality. It’s nice to see them (cadets) grow throughout their training, see them self-motivate,” he commented.

For Cadet George Ann Voss of Texas A&M Corpus Christi, this training was both a surprise and a very helpful educational exercise.  “This training shows how real the military is, getting down and dirty. You need to know the reality of the Army: How to keep organized and have situational awareness,” she said. Voss believes these are all important in being in the Army.

The cadets will continue this part of their training for another day-and-a-half before they come back to their other duties.

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Katrinia McGuire

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